Tag Archives: NEW YORK

What’s Up Doc?

4 Jan

I am getting back to reality after a two-week holiday stint spent relaxing with my husband, watching movies, eating and drinking with friends and sleeping longer than usual.

I am sure you all indulged in your own version of that as well. To that, I say cheers and well done!Well good morning 2011, now it is time to get back into the swing of things and start anew. Whatever that means, right?

I realize I have been straying away from fashion posts but I go with what I feel and lately I have been digging a bit deeper and looking outside of the “what to wear” scope. (Hope you don’t mind) I promise there is more fashion on the horizon.Anyway, as with most things in my life, I lean toward the uncontrived and what is more organic and real than documentaries? They evoke real emotions and shed light on people, places and events that otherwise would remain unknown.

I consider myself a connoisseur of the arts in general, (if you haven’t already picked up on that) and think these should land in your “What to Watch” queue for the cold and sometimes listless month of January.

Luella says…Document Everything.

Exit Through the Gift Shop

“This is the inside story of Street Art – a brutal and revealing account of what happens when fame, money and vandalism collide. Exit Through the Gift Shop follows an eccentric shop-keeper turned amateur film-maker as he attempts to capture many of the world’s most infamous vandals on camera, only to have a British stencil artist named Banksy turn the camcorder back on its owner with wildly unexpected results.”


Surfwise

According to the NEW YORK TIMES, “There are many different ways to drop off the grid, but few dropped off with such style and urgency as Dorian Paskowitz, the paterfamilias of what is lovingly and at times enviably described as the first family of surfing. It was an intensity in part born of his passionately felt engagement with history as a Jew, which took him from Stanford Medical School in the 1940s to button-down respectability in the 1950s and, thereafter, on the road and into the blue yonder with a devoted wife, nine children, a succession of battered campers and the surfboards that were by turns the family’s cradles, playpens, lifelines and shields.”

 

Funky Monks

One reviewer writes, “this independent production in living black & white was shot of the Red Hot Chili Peppers as they became “Funky Monks” with producer extraordinaire Rick Rubin and retreated to a virtual monastery of an empty house in the hills above L.A. to record their greatest musical achievement ever, 1991’s “Blood Sugar Sex Magik”.

The personality of L.A. is every bit as much the star of this film as is the personalities of the Chili Peppers themselves. The feel of the town is everywhere, from the record offices where the executives explain the concept behind the recording taking place in the fashion it did to the locations where Anthony is interviewed regarding the lyrics of “Under The Bridge” to the wrap party that is held at the house once the recording has been completed…the soul of Los Angeles (such as it is) and the symbiotic association it has with the band are factors that set this filmed “making of” documentary a step above all the others; there is much more than four guys in a studio and a producer in a booth…it is an encapsulation of a city and its most identifiable band, frozen in time forever.”


Helvetica

Gary Huswit says, “Helvetica is a feature-length independent film about typography, graphic design and global visual culture. It looks at the proliferation of one typeface (which celebrated its 50th birthday in 2007) as part of a larger conversation about the way type affects our lives. The film is an exploration of urban spaces in major cities and the type that inhabits them, and a fluid discussion with renowned designers about their work, the creative process, and the choices and aesthetics behind their use of type.”


So watch the above documentaries and let me know what you think. We found them profound in their own subjects.

There is also something very appealing to have the opportunity to see things for myself, a peek behind the curtain if you will. What would your life’s documentary be about?

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A Century of Style.

4 Nov

Women’s Wear Daily is in all intents and purposes, the fashion bible. It is the eyes and ears of the fashion industry and has been known to launch careers with its features.

Working in the showroom, I looked forward to reading it every morning. WWD and a cup of coffee was the perfect start to my day.

It began in June of 1910 and this year, celebrates its 100th year Anniversary.

To celebrate, WWD did a beautiful 100 Remarkable Moments in Fashion pictorial and asked some of the world’s best designers to design a piece for a charity auction that runs now through November 18th.

I have listed some of the highlights below.

The pieces are haute couture, one of kind and made especially for this event.

We can bid or dream, can’t we?

(to BID click on the sketches to be directed to the auction website. Good Luck.)

Luella says…J’adore Couture.

“DREAM DRESS”

 

“COLLECTION SHIFT”

 

“TRENCH COAT”

 

“NAVAJO STYLE SWEATER DRESS”

 

“EVENING GOWN”

 

“CHANDELIER OUTFIT”

“BODYSUIT AND SKIRT”

 

“WOODSTOCK JACKET”

“HEAD TO TOE LOOK”

 

“PRIVE EVENING DRESS”

 

“100  BOWS DRESS”

 

“BEAUTY IN BLOOM ORIGINAL PAINTING”

“STYLIZED WAGONEER”


The art of couture is slowly dying out. In a world of instant gratification and economy shifts, it is becoming less practical no matter your status. If you have unlimited income, embrace your chance to own a part of history.

If you win the auction, plan a party and send me an invitation please.

Estee & Aerin says.

20 Oct

  

I love Peonies. They are one of my favorites flowers. I had them on the tables for our wedding in various ball jars, green depression glass and white hobnail vases. It was so beautiful. When I was creating the aesthetic in my head, I knew I wanted it to be vintage-antique. Truly the less it looked like a wedding, the better.

 I read an article a while back from either Vanity Fair or Vogue discussing New York socialite Aerin Lauder and how she puts on the perfect dinner party for her high-profile friends.

 

(via Vanity Fair)

(via ELLE DECOR)

The main take away, (besides desperately wanting to be invited) was her quoting her grandmother, Estee Lauder, in saying “One should never have matching china for it looks rented.”

(via blueskybutterflystudio)

 I loved that concept. I decided against following the tradition of picking out a china pattern, and instead collected vintage mismatched dinner plates to use for our head table of 22 people. What could be more meaningful than serving the most important people in our lives on something  we then get to keep with us forever?  

 

 

There are a couple of things to remember when doing this.

  • Start well enough ahead so you can space out the research and expense.
  • Make sure you buy plates that are AT LEAST 9 inches across, 10 inches is the best. Vintage china comes in various sizes and I made the mistake of buying plates that were too small to use for dinner.
  • A lot of sellers specialize in china, so research all they have for sale, so if you find more than one, you can combine shipping.
  • Established brands are Haviland, Homer Laughlin, Bristol and my favorite is Spode.

Flea markets, estate sales, Etsy and Ebay are the best resources. I did a little shopping on Etsy for you. Just click on the photos for details.

 

Luella says…Add a Splash of Significance

 I also LOVE these other items I found while I was searching for the plates. Why not round out your table?

Vintage china plates adorned with modern artist lettering.

Vintage platter with Pink Lady Artist motif.

Vintage Clay Lace Platter (various sizes available).

Vintage patina tray. Perfect for a candle & vase centerpiece.

Vintage Pyrex glass bud vase.

 

Now each time we throw a dinner party I get to use our plates and watch the significance grow.

Thank you Estee for your clever advice, thank you Aerin for passing it on.

Nadine in New York.

22 Sep

 

 

 I am missing New York fashion market week for the first time in 8 years. It feels very strange to not look forward to enjoying the onset of Fall weather and being able to finally wear the items I have been patiently saving all Summer. (Although, if you live in Southern California,  you know I should have been wearing them these past two months when it has been overcast and 60 degrees.)

I digress, my great friend and hairstylist Nadine went on a last-minute trip to NYC this past weekend with her cute fiancé. Besides telling her to have a wonderful time and visit some of my favorite restaurants, I gave her strict instructions. Shop around and take some quick Polaroid shots of your LOVE items so I can post them here as Nadine in New York.

Nadine’s choices  inspired me and I spent my afternoon diving into the design houses of YSL, Chloe & Martin Grant’s  Autumn/Winter 2010 collections on Style.com. I then took the liberty of choosing some of my own LOVE items to share.

Enjoy the essence of Ready to Wear.

MARTIN GRANT is an Australian born designer

Fashion House: PARIS

  

 

YVES SAINT LAURENT is designed by Stefano Pilati  

Fashion House: PARIS 

  

 

CHLOÉ is designed by Hannah MacGibbon

Fashion House: PARIS

                                                                                                   

 

 

An Introduction.

9 Sep

 

Welcome to Luella says. I have been meaning to get this up and running forever now but just couldn’t find the time. Ok, in truth I just got married and was my own wedding planner. Needless to say I was a bit busy. Anyway, it is a personal perspective on life and fashion. In order for that to make sense to those of you who don’t know me, read the introduction below and become acquainted. Everyone is an expert on their own life, I have been fortunate, through my professional career, to become an expert on fashion as well.

My mother always told me, “life is a series of choices” and so I followed that mantra and still do. When I graduated from college in 2001, I was a bit lost. Up until that point there was an unspoken formula to follow. Go to school, go to college, graduate and get a job. What no one tells you though, is just how difficult it is to find a job you are happy with and qualified for at the same time.  I had done well in college but the marketplace for new graduates in 2001 was terrible. I moved back home to Wisconsin from Arizona and needed guidance. What next? I was lucky to have a Mom who I considered a good barometer on life. She told me to make a wish list of my dream jobs and to think big. Life is about taking risks and I decided I was going to follow my heart. I went to task on my list, laughing a bit along the way figuring none of these organizations were even going to glance at my limited resume. Well I was wrong. Marie Claire magazine offered me a post-graduate internship to work underneath the Fashion Merchandising Editor in the sample closet. In actuality, I had to pay $600 for graduate credits to be able to work there for free. Somehow that didn’t seem right, but it was the push that got me to move to New York City and officially begin my foray into fashion.

I had never been to New York but it was on my “life list” and so like a scene out of Felicity, I flew there, took a taxi and when dropped off at the curb looked up and realized this is my life now, put your head down and make something of yourself. Everyone and I mean EVERYONE has to put their time in. I worked at Marie Claire for five months, even though originally I was supposed to work for three. I kept thinking I would weasel myself into the ranks here eventually. The issue was this job was for college credit which I didn’t need and didn’t pay a salary or offer benefits of any kind. (Sidebar…I did get to go the Christmas party at Tavern on the Green though which was an amazing experience.) Anyway, I was working 60 hours a week, LOVING my job and exposure to everything fashion but struggling to stay afloat monetarily in Manhattan. I was 22, young, passionate and desperate for a salaried job. Finally through a reference from the Accessories Editor at Marie Claire,  I got a job at Rafe New York as the Assistant to the Vice President and Sales and Marketing Director. I loved both of these jobs so much. I was exposed to everything imaginable because in essence that is New York living. After a year I decided I was not a New Yorker. I moved to Los Angeles, another destination on my “life list”. I was Coast surfing and landed in Beverly Hills on Almont Drive with my childhood best friend, Kelly.

LA was much more my scene. I didn’t realize how much I longed for space, grass, sunshine and the ability to drive my own car. I LOVE New York, I think it is one of the best cities in the world but not to live in, at least not for me. I got a job working in a multi-line showroom downtown in the fashion district and was on my way to building my career again. After working for almost 3 years for 8 different designers, I got the opportunity to open a US Showroom for a Danish women’s designer collection, Casch Copenhagen. It really was my dream job. I flew to Denmark and gave my business plan to the “suits” so to speak and they said yes! What an experience. I have since spent the last 5.5 years moving from Account Executive, to National Sales & Brand Manager to Director of Sales. I have weathered many highs and lows with this company. I loved loved loved my job. I put everything into it. I took an almost scientific approach to the business.  The fashion industry has too many showrooms, too many brands, too many designers etc. I knew the importance of being at the helm of a European indie brand and relished all the opportunities that came along with it.

Things have recently changed in my life. My scope has shifted. Maybe it is getting married, maybe it is the internal company struggle we went through these last 1.5 years or maybe it is the realization I need to move on to a new challenge. I am not sure but I will always believe working for Casch Copenhagen, Groa, Gro a Live and By Gro Abrahamsson changed my life. I will always be grateful. Thank you to those who remained constant, you gave me an experience unlike anything I thought I would have growing up in a small town in Wisconsin. So looking forward I move on to the next chapter.

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