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The Art of Deco

20 Jan

To me, Art Deco is like a fantastic wine; it is the perfect blend of fashion with architecture and design and encompasses all of my visual art passions.

According to Wikipedia, Led by the best designers in the decorative arts such as fashion, and interior design, Art Deco affected all areas of design throughout the 1920s and 1930s, including architecture and industrial design, as well as the visual arts such as painting, the graphic arts and film. At the time, this style was seen as elegant, glamorous, functional and modern.It  could also be described as a movement of sorts. A rebelling from designing with political or philosophical roots. It was simply about design. Nothing more, nothing less.

It was the soul of the 1920’s and 30’s and  served as the foundation for design movements that emerged throughout the past 80 years. The “art deco aesthetic” is primarily found in fashion, architecture, art and typography but its influences can still be found in modern design.

Luella says…That building matches my dress.


What era of design do you love?

Through the Lens. Sølve Sundsbø

13 Jan

I love Scandinavia. As you know, my family comes from Sweden and I worked for a Danish company for 8 years and so I have been immersed to say the least.

Now for a little bit of Norway.  Sølve Sundsbø was born in 1970 and garnered an interest in photography in his early twenties by enrolling in the London College of Printing. Once there he answered an ad for Nick Knight who was looking for an assistant and alas his career began.

According to Ykone online, “He concentrates on volume, lines and graphics and alters his images with superimpositions, use of filters and transparency, creating truly remarkable pictures.”

“If I’ve got a style,” says Sundsbo, “it’s that I’ve got no style.”

I personally love the visual spectrum he lives in. While many photographers work in a streamlined aesthetic he embraces the varied sources of light, textures and manipulations. He vividly captures light and emotion.

Luella says…And the Series Continues.

(all photos SOURCED at artandcommerce.com)

To be able to see the world through the scope of a photographic lens must be very powerful. What you see is not always what you got. The artistry is making people believe there is not a difference.

What’s Up Doc?

4 Jan

I am getting back to reality after a two-week holiday stint spent relaxing with my husband, watching movies, eating and drinking with friends and sleeping longer than usual.

I am sure you all indulged in your own version of that as well. To that, I say cheers and well done!Well good morning 2011, now it is time to get back into the swing of things and start anew. Whatever that means, right?

I realize I have been straying away from fashion posts but I go with what I feel and lately I have been digging a bit deeper and looking outside of the “what to wear” scope. (Hope you don’t mind) I promise there is more fashion on the horizon.Anyway, as with most things in my life, I lean toward the uncontrived and what is more organic and real than documentaries? They evoke real emotions and shed light on people, places and events that otherwise would remain unknown.

I consider myself a connoisseur of the arts in general, (if you haven’t already picked up on that) and think these should land in your “What to Watch” queue for the cold and sometimes listless month of January.

Luella says…Document Everything.

Exit Through the Gift Shop

“This is the inside story of Street Art – a brutal and revealing account of what happens when fame, money and vandalism collide. Exit Through the Gift Shop follows an eccentric shop-keeper turned amateur film-maker as he attempts to capture many of the world’s most infamous vandals on camera, only to have a British stencil artist named Banksy turn the camcorder back on its owner with wildly unexpected results.”


Surfwise

According to the NEW YORK TIMES, “There are many different ways to drop off the grid, but few dropped off with such style and urgency as Dorian Paskowitz, the paterfamilias of what is lovingly and at times enviably described as the first family of surfing. It was an intensity in part born of his passionately felt engagement with history as a Jew, which took him from Stanford Medical School in the 1940s to button-down respectability in the 1950s and, thereafter, on the road and into the blue yonder with a devoted wife, nine children, a succession of battered campers and the surfboards that were by turns the family’s cradles, playpens, lifelines and shields.”

 

Funky Monks

One reviewer writes, “this independent production in living black & white was shot of the Red Hot Chili Peppers as they became “Funky Monks” with producer extraordinaire Rick Rubin and retreated to a virtual monastery of an empty house in the hills above L.A. to record their greatest musical achievement ever, 1991’s “Blood Sugar Sex Magik”.

The personality of L.A. is every bit as much the star of this film as is the personalities of the Chili Peppers themselves. The feel of the town is everywhere, from the record offices where the executives explain the concept behind the recording taking place in the fashion it did to the locations where Anthony is interviewed regarding the lyrics of “Under The Bridge” to the wrap party that is held at the house once the recording has been completed…the soul of Los Angeles (such as it is) and the symbiotic association it has with the band are factors that set this filmed “making of” documentary a step above all the others; there is much more than four guys in a studio and a producer in a booth…it is an encapsulation of a city and its most identifiable band, frozen in time forever.”


Helvetica

Gary Huswit says, “Helvetica is a feature-length independent film about typography, graphic design and global visual culture. It looks at the proliferation of one typeface (which celebrated its 50th birthday in 2007) as part of a larger conversation about the way type affects our lives. The film is an exploration of urban spaces in major cities and the type that inhabits them, and a fluid discussion with renowned designers about their work, the creative process, and the choices and aesthetics behind their use of type.”


So watch the above documentaries and let me know what you think. We found them profound in their own subjects.

There is also something very appealing to have the opportunity to see things for myself, a peek behind the curtain if you will. What would your life’s documentary be about?

Through the Lens – Paolo Roversi

28 Dec

One of the things I  love the most about my blog is the research I get to do each day in preparation for my content. I love being able to learn as I go and immerse myself in areas I never knew much about before. One of those areas is definitely photography.

As you know from earlier posts, I have loved editorials and fashion photo shoots ever since I was small. From the grandeur of the poses, to the artistry of the clothing, to the beauty of the landscape locations; they simply speak to me.After a bit of thought, I decided I needed to create an outlet and launched Luella’s Visual Industry on Tumblr. It is an archive of fashion photos, paintings and pictures I wish I had shot, created, styled or photographed myself.

In doing my research for Luella’s Visual Industry, I stumbled upon a group of photographers I think are a large step above the masses. I already detailed Steven Meisel and have a bunch on the horizon but today I present Paolo Roversi. Paolo Roversi is an Italian-born fashion photographer who currently lives and works in Paris. Born in Ravenna in 1947, Paolo Roversi’s interest in photography was kindled as a teenager during a family vacation to Spain in 1964. Paolo Roversi’s trademark 8 x 10” Polaroid format and very long exposures have a romantic and ethereal quality. His favourite lighting is window light or a Mag Flashlight to light his models.

According to A BLOG CURATED BY, “As a quiet force in photography for over 25 years, Paolo Roversi has firmly grounded his softly organic and profoundly intimate work within the more avantgarde circles of fashion. Over the years, Roversi has helped define the aesthetics of many key players who manage to sit just under the global commercial and celebrity radar, those intelligent labels from Romeo Gigli to Undercover and Yohji Yamamoto. Accompanying this inclination for the darker side of the industry, Roversi has held his fascination in the faces of muses such Stella Tennant and Kirsten Owen – protean beauties whose faces have stood the test of time.”

Luella says…Representing the Dark Side.

(All images sourced from PAOLOROVERSI.COM)

His photographs represent haunted hopefullness.

Where this is darkness, there is light.

Go There.

22 Dec

I am not an artist. I just don’t have the talent. I wish I could look at a blank canvas and know exactly what to draw or where to go with my vision but such is not to be.

I was born a consultant of sorts. Meaning I can tell you what works and what doesn’t but I can’t create it myself. My skill set is much more in the performing arts spectrum rather than the artistry of paint, pencil and ink to canvas.I have always admired the art world though with its chic gallery shows and pedestrians lining up to be blown away by the abstracts, paintings and works of their favorite artists.

I used to think one had to possess a certain “eye” for understanding but as of late I realize it is what you make it. If you allow yourself to go there, things tend to take on a whole new meaning.Such was the case when I was doing research for a project and stumbled across the art works of Pierre Soulages.

He was born in 1919 and according to Claire Rosemberg of The Telegraph, is famously known for switching direction halfway through his career to emphasise how light is reflected from the colour black – a concept he calls “ultra black”, or outrenoir. Using thick layers of black paint, he scrapes and digs and etches using bits of rubber, spoons or tiny rakes to create smooth and rough textures that absorb or reject light, subtly changing monotonous black.He recently hosted his own gallery show, at Le Centre de Georges Pompidou in Paris in 2009 and at age 91, is still living and working in a flat in the South of France that overlooks the Mediterranean.(Pierre Soulage’s shadow painted by Klaus Guingand 2005)

When interviewed for his gallery show last year, Pierre said, “It is touching to see 63 years of my work brought together, but I don’t much like the word ‘retrospective’,” he added. “I am still painting, I have works drying in the studio.”

At 91, is that a testament to spending one’s life living out their dreams instead of waiting to pursue them? Perhaps.

Luella says…Dig a Little Deeper.

(all photos sourced from Pierre-Soulages.com)

I love his work. I would never have found him had I not been a bit idle.

Moral of this story, is to take a little more time out for yourself. Stop and absorb your surroundings, breathe, be present and notice the details.

Give that to yourself this Christmas.

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