Tag Archives: Movies

What’s Up Doc?

4 Jan

I am getting back to reality after a two-week holiday stint spent relaxing with my husband, watching movies, eating and drinking with friends and sleeping longer than usual.

I am sure you all indulged in your own version of that as well. To that, I say cheers and well done!Well good morning 2011, now it is time to get back into the swing of things and start anew. Whatever that means, right?

I realize I have been straying away from fashion posts but I go with what I feel and lately I have been digging a bit deeper and looking outside of the “what to wear” scope. (Hope you don’t mind) I promise there is more fashion on the horizon.Anyway, as with most things in my life, I lean toward the uncontrived and what is more organic and real than documentaries? They evoke real emotions and shed light on people, places and events that otherwise would remain unknown.

I consider myself a connoisseur of the arts in general, (if you haven’t already picked up on that) and think these should land in your “What to Watch” queue for the cold and sometimes listless month of January.

Luella says…Document Everything.

Exit Through the Gift Shop

“This is the inside story of Street Art – a brutal and revealing account of what happens when fame, money and vandalism collide. Exit Through the Gift Shop follows an eccentric shop-keeper turned amateur film-maker as he attempts to capture many of the world’s most infamous vandals on camera, only to have a British stencil artist named Banksy turn the camcorder back on its owner with wildly unexpected results.”


Surfwise

According to the NEW YORK TIMES, “There are many different ways to drop off the grid, but few dropped off with such style and urgency as Dorian Paskowitz, the paterfamilias of what is lovingly and at times enviably described as the first family of surfing. It was an intensity in part born of his passionately felt engagement with history as a Jew, which took him from Stanford Medical School in the 1940s to button-down respectability in the 1950s and, thereafter, on the road and into the blue yonder with a devoted wife, nine children, a succession of battered campers and the surfboards that were by turns the family’s cradles, playpens, lifelines and shields.”

 

Funky Monks

One reviewer writes, “this independent production in living black & white was shot of the Red Hot Chili Peppers as they became “Funky Monks” with producer extraordinaire Rick Rubin and retreated to a virtual monastery of an empty house in the hills above L.A. to record their greatest musical achievement ever, 1991’s “Blood Sugar Sex Magik”.

The personality of L.A. is every bit as much the star of this film as is the personalities of the Chili Peppers themselves. The feel of the town is everywhere, from the record offices where the executives explain the concept behind the recording taking place in the fashion it did to the locations where Anthony is interviewed regarding the lyrics of “Under The Bridge” to the wrap party that is held at the house once the recording has been completed…the soul of Los Angeles (such as it is) and the symbiotic association it has with the band are factors that set this filmed “making of” documentary a step above all the others; there is much more than four guys in a studio and a producer in a booth…it is an encapsulation of a city and its most identifiable band, frozen in time forever.”


Helvetica

Gary Huswit says, “Helvetica is a feature-length independent film about typography, graphic design and global visual culture. It looks at the proliferation of one typeface (which celebrated its 50th birthday in 2007) as part of a larger conversation about the way type affects our lives. The film is an exploration of urban spaces in major cities and the type that inhabits them, and a fluid discussion with renowned designers about their work, the creative process, and the choices and aesthetics behind their use of type.”


So watch the above documentaries and let me know what you think. We found them profound in their own subjects.

There is also something very appealing to have the opportunity to see things for myself, a peek behind the curtain if you will. What would your life’s documentary be about?

Hit Play.

17 Dec

It is pouring rain here in California and I love it. Coming from the Midwest where bad weather is a mainstay, it brings me back to my childhood and makes me want to stay in bed and watch movies.That is one of my favorite things about the Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years holidays as well. The world stops functioning in its normal capacity and we are allowed to drink a little extra wine, eat another helping and stay in a our pajamas all day.

Even if you have stressful family situations, at least you are spending time together and what better way to do that than to sit around a fire and watch a great film. So to enjoy the upcoming holiday to its fullest, or in some cases merely survive, make some popcorn, pour yourself a large glass of egg-nog, gather everyone in the family room and watch something together.I have the task this year of trying to pick out which movies to bring with us when we spend Christmas at my in-laws. It inspired me to start collecting some good choices and I figured I would share them with you so you have time to secure them before next week. (YES!! Christmas really is next week)

(FYI-Some are not technically “Christmas movies” but were shot in Winter with the holiday season in mind.)

Luella says…Merry Movies.

(in no particular order)

Which Christmas movies do you love?

What holiday family traditions do you have?

Sofia, Charlotte, Vogue & 1974.

17 Nov

Similar to my Marilyn photo, I have had this Sofia Coppola for VOGUE article on Charlotte Rampling being “The Sexiest Woman in the World 1974″ on my vision board since October of 2003. I love Sofia’s description of her journey and relate to her visual obsession of photographs.

(Read abridged article below)

I Wanna Be Like You by Sofia Coppola from Vogue, Oct 2003

Sofia Coppola grew up pasting pictures of the sultry heroines of seventies magazines to her bedroom wall in California.

Helmut Newton’s portrait of Charlotte Rampling from the seventies is one of my favorite photographs of all time. When I was a kid growing up in the country, magazines were so important to me. I would get The Face and Vogue and French Vogue – they were my link to the rest of the world. And although my parents took us all over when they traveled, high school in Napa was far away from the sophistication and glamour I saw in the pages of those magazines.

Like most teenage girls, I covered my walls with the pictures I tore out of them. I think when you’re younger you look at women and pictures of women to define who you want to grow up to be, and they make a deep impression on you. I always loved images of Tina Chow, Paloma Picasso, and Anjelica Huston. I remember I met Anjelica when I was fourteen. She told me I would grow into my nose, which I appreciated.

The image of Charlotte Rampling sitting naked on a table seemed to me the ultimate portrait of a woman. I like photos that have a story to them. This picture could almost be a still from a film: it makes me think about what just happened and what will happen next. There’s something going on between her and the photographer, the way he’s looking at her and she’s looking back at him. She’s so striking and cool, and you can tell she’s smart. Who doesn’t want to be that?

The seventies seemed like such a glamorous time. It was before sportswear became normal; women didn’t wear sneakers. There was a romance and a decadence to the way those women looked that I found very appealing. I remember being impressed by the French actress Aurore Clément, who was married to my dad’s production designer Dean Tavoularis and was a friend of the family’s. I think she even posed for Helmut Newton when she was younger, and she epitomized a certain kind of sophisticated French beauty. She would wear Yves Saint Laurent – not the super-sexy slash-necked looks but silk pleated skirts with a little blouse and round, flat shoes. She was very chic.

I began collecting fashion photography, encouraged by my mother. She gave me a William Klein photo of a woman smoking with roses on her hat, and another of a model on a Paris street. I still collect photos and art, and I love it. Some of my favorite pieces are by Philip-Lorca diCorsia, Richard Prince, Takashi Homma, Larry Sultan, Elizabeth Peyton. Just the other day I bought a Bob Richardson piece I love of a model on a beach with a tear in her eye. I tried to buy the Rampling photo a few years ago, but it was so expensive!

When I’m working on a film project, I put together books of visual references in a certain mood, even if I have no idea how they’ll relate to the final product. I still love looking at magazines and tearing pages out, and I still have the Charlotte Rampling picture on my wall.

The photo and article inspired me to go back in time and seek out some of the beauty, film and fashion icons of the decades before I was born.

Luella says…I Wanna Be Like Them.

Charlotte Rampling

Catherine Deneuve

Grace Jones

Twiggy

Jane Birkin

Sofia Loren

Mia Farrow

Brigitte Bardot

Edie Sedgwick

Lauren Hutton

What inspires you? What do you tear out of magazines or bookmark in your google reader?

Figure it out and stock up.

PS. Don’t forget to check out Sofia Coppola’s new movie SOMEWHERE coming out December 22nd. It won the top prize at the 2010 Venice Film Festival.


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