Tag Archives: photography

Through the Lens. Sølve Sundsbø

13 Jan

I love Scandinavia. As you know, my family comes from Sweden and I worked for a Danish company for 8 years and so I have been immersed to say the least.

Now for a little bit of Norway.  Sølve Sundsbø was born in 1970 and garnered an interest in photography in his early twenties by enrolling in the London College of Printing. Once there he answered an ad for Nick Knight who was looking for an assistant and alas his career began.

According to Ykone online, “He concentrates on volume, lines and graphics and alters his images with superimpositions, use of filters and transparency, creating truly remarkable pictures.”

“If I’ve got a style,” says Sundsbo, “it’s that I’ve got no style.”

I personally love the visual spectrum he lives in. While many photographers work in a streamlined aesthetic he embraces the varied sources of light, textures and manipulations. He vividly captures light and emotion.

Luella says…And the Series Continues.

(all photos SOURCED at artandcommerce.com)

To be able to see the world through the scope of a photographic lens must be very powerful. What you see is not always what you got. The artistry is making people believe there is not a difference.

Through the Lens – Paolo Roversi

28 Dec

One of the things I  love the most about my blog is the research I get to do each day in preparation for my content. I love being able to learn as I go and immerse myself in areas I never knew much about before. One of those areas is definitely photography.

As you know from earlier posts, I have loved editorials and fashion photo shoots ever since I was small. From the grandeur of the poses, to the artistry of the clothing, to the beauty of the landscape locations; they simply speak to me.After a bit of thought, I decided I needed to create an outlet and launched Luella’s Visual Industry on Tumblr. It is an archive of fashion photos, paintings and pictures I wish I had shot, created, styled or photographed myself.

In doing my research for Luella’s Visual Industry, I stumbled upon a group of photographers I think are a large step above the masses. I already detailed Steven Meisel and have a bunch on the horizon but today I present Paolo Roversi. Paolo Roversi is an Italian-born fashion photographer who currently lives and works in Paris. Born in Ravenna in 1947, Paolo Roversi’s interest in photography was kindled as a teenager during a family vacation to Spain in 1964. Paolo Roversi’s trademark 8 x 10” Polaroid format and very long exposures have a romantic and ethereal quality. His favourite lighting is window light or a Mag Flashlight to light his models.

According to A BLOG CURATED BY, “As a quiet force in photography for over 25 years, Paolo Roversi has firmly grounded his softly organic and profoundly intimate work within the more avantgarde circles of fashion. Over the years, Roversi has helped define the aesthetics of many key players who manage to sit just under the global commercial and celebrity radar, those intelligent labels from Romeo Gigli to Undercover and Yohji Yamamoto. Accompanying this inclination for the darker side of the industry, Roversi has held his fascination in the faces of muses such Stella Tennant and Kirsten Owen – protean beauties whose faces have stood the test of time.”

Luella says…Representing the Dark Side.

(All images sourced from PAOLOROVERSI.COM)

His photographs represent haunted hopefullness.

Where this is darkness, there is light.

Where the Wild Things Are.

9 Dec

A colleague of mine suggested I look into the photography of Gregory Colbert. I had never heard of him before and was completely blown away by his unbelievable images.

He is Canadian by descent and began his career in Paris making documentary films on social issues he believed strongly needed a voice.

He has much matured since then and his latest exhibition entitled, Ashes and Snow has been viewed by over 10 million people and is the most attended exhibition of a living artist in history.

View the video below of the actual shoot.

Gregory says, “In exploring the shared language and poetic sensibilities of all animals, I am working towards rediscovering the common ground that once existed when people lived in harmony with animals. The images depict a world that is without beginning or end, here or there, past or present.”In my own humble opinion, I think it is important to reflect back on a time centuries ago, when we were able to live symbiotically with nature and animals. Colonization and the progression of technology will never allow us/ Earth to go back to those simpler times but there are places in our world where this does and can exist.

I feel privileged to have found these photos and hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

Luella says…Through the Lens –

Gregory Colbert.

(All PHOTOS sourced from www.ashesandsnow.org)

The beauty of photography, dance, the written word, music etc. is the essence of interpretation.

One person’s genius can make another person believe.

Sofia, Charlotte, Vogue & 1974.

17 Nov

Similar to my Marilyn photo, I have had this Sofia Coppola for VOGUE article on Charlotte Rampling being “The Sexiest Woman in the World 1974″ on my vision board since October of 2003. I love Sofia’s description of her journey and relate to her visual obsession of photographs.

(Read abridged article below)

I Wanna Be Like You by Sofia Coppola from Vogue, Oct 2003

Sofia Coppola grew up pasting pictures of the sultry heroines of seventies magazines to her bedroom wall in California.

Helmut Newton’s portrait of Charlotte Rampling from the seventies is one of my favorite photographs of all time. When I was a kid growing up in the country, magazines were so important to me. I would get The Face and Vogue and French Vogue – they were my link to the rest of the world. And although my parents took us all over when they traveled, high school in Napa was far away from the sophistication and glamour I saw in the pages of those magazines.

Like most teenage girls, I covered my walls with the pictures I tore out of them. I think when you’re younger you look at women and pictures of women to define who you want to grow up to be, and they make a deep impression on you. I always loved images of Tina Chow, Paloma Picasso, and Anjelica Huston. I remember I met Anjelica when I was fourteen. She told me I would grow into my nose, which I appreciated.

The image of Charlotte Rampling sitting naked on a table seemed to me the ultimate portrait of a woman. I like photos that have a story to them. This picture could almost be a still from a film: it makes me think about what just happened and what will happen next. There’s something going on between her and the photographer, the way he’s looking at her and she’s looking back at him. She’s so striking and cool, and you can tell she’s smart. Who doesn’t want to be that?

The seventies seemed like such a glamorous time. It was before sportswear became normal; women didn’t wear sneakers. There was a romance and a decadence to the way those women looked that I found very appealing. I remember being impressed by the French actress Aurore Clément, who was married to my dad’s production designer Dean Tavoularis and was a friend of the family’s. I think she even posed for Helmut Newton when she was younger, and she epitomized a certain kind of sophisticated French beauty. She would wear Yves Saint Laurent – not the super-sexy slash-necked looks but silk pleated skirts with a little blouse and round, flat shoes. She was very chic.

I began collecting fashion photography, encouraged by my mother. She gave me a William Klein photo of a woman smoking with roses on her hat, and another of a model on a Paris street. I still collect photos and art, and I love it. Some of my favorite pieces are by Philip-Lorca diCorsia, Richard Prince, Takashi Homma, Larry Sultan, Elizabeth Peyton. Just the other day I bought a Bob Richardson piece I love of a model on a beach with a tear in her eye. I tried to buy the Rampling photo a few years ago, but it was so expensive!

When I’m working on a film project, I put together books of visual references in a certain mood, even if I have no idea how they’ll relate to the final product. I still love looking at magazines and tearing pages out, and I still have the Charlotte Rampling picture on my wall.

The photo and article inspired me to go back in time and seek out some of the beauty, film and fashion icons of the decades before I was born.

Luella says…I Wanna Be Like Them.

Charlotte Rampling

Catherine Deneuve

Grace Jones

Twiggy

Jane Birkin

Sofia Loren

Mia Farrow

Brigitte Bardot

Edie Sedgwick

Lauren Hutton

What inspires you? What do you tear out of magazines or bookmark in your google reader?

Figure it out and stock up.

PS. Don’t forget to check out Sofia Coppola’s new movie SOMEWHERE coming out December 22nd. It won the top prize at the 2010 Venice Film Festival.


Through the Lens. Steven Meisel.

8 Nov

Steven Meisel is a genius. He is also a photographer. Each day when searching for beautiful photographs to accompany my various posts, I seem to stumble upon one of his and instantly fall in love. I realize this is not a coincidence but a tribute to just how amazingly talented he is.

Steven Meisel himself is difficult to describe. He is elusive and intensely private. He is even known to photograph behind a curtain or inside a black box. I assume he feels his photographs speak for themselves. They definitely speak to me.

According to Wikipedia,

“His fascination for beauty and models started at a young age. At that time Meisel didn’t play with toys, but would instead draw women all the time. He used to turn to magazines like Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar as sources of inspiration for his drawings. Meisel dreamt of women from high society like Gloria Guinness and Babe Paley, who personified the idea of beauty. Other icons were his mother and sister. One of Meisel’s first jobs was to work for fashion designer Halston as an illustrator. He also taught illustration part-time at Parsons. Meisel never thought he could become a photographer. He admired photographers like Jerry Schatzberg, Irving Penn, Richard Avedon and Bert Stern. He felt that illustration was a thing of the past and found photography as a lasting medium.”

(Click on the photo below for an amazing compilation of his career by Ana Lee on Live Journal.)

In February of 2005, I was at fashion week in New York City. VOGUE ITALIA sponsors a portion of it every season and always gives out its newest issue. After looking through this one, I absolutely fell in LOVE with Steven Meisel’s editorial on Victorian era couture. I tore off the cover and one of the looks inside and had it on my vision board in my office for five years. It wasn’t until I did a bit of research online that I found the rest of the stunning photos I had long since forgotten.

If you know me, you know how much I love British & European period films. (Hold your breath as this will be a post in the near future.) These photos evoke the same reaction in me.

Luella says…Regarding Steven

This is the first of many Through the Lens posts. I will even be revisiting Steven Meisel, as he is one of my favorite contemporary fashion photographers and his work is so stunning, I couldn’t sum it up with just this editorial.

Similar to an amazing movie, a great book or the perfect song, the right photograph; no matter the subject, can transport you. Go with it.

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